Category Archives: Restaurants

Visit to Morristown, Tennessee

American Press travel News–July 9th, Bob & Barb “On The Road Again”-Once in the city of Morristown, we had visited with Anne G. Ross, Director of Tourism at the Area Chamber of Commerce Office. Anne sent us on a very informative itinerary that covered just a bit of the great things Morristown is all about.

We checked out part of the Lake way Area that included a visit to Cherokee Lake. The fishy lake has over 700-miles of shoreline. The ubiquitous largemouth and smallmouth bass are king here. We visited with shoreline angler’s cat fishing, and looking for brim and crappie. Everyone was having a great time, as the water was clean and clear and the temperatures were warm, but mitigated by a nice shore side breeze. We visited with Sam & Delores Phillips owners of Morristown Marine. Sam discussed the seven bass tournaments he runs each year on Lake Norris, Cherokee, South Holston, Watts Bar and Douglas Lake. He has 910 members of his invitational only events. They draw 220-230 boats for each event. Winners take home big bucks per event, ongoing for over 11-years. https://www.morristownmarine.com

Always interested in history, we headed over to the General Longstreet Museum. The historic home was used by General James Longstreet as his Civil War Confederate headquarters in the winter of 1863-64. The site includes a replica of an 1860’s tailor shop where Director Kelly Ford makes period military uniforms. We met up with “Dewey” a very serious Civil War buff, and he regaled us with a blow-by-blow of various Civil War skirmishes, dressed in a Confederate military outfit, he laid out everything he knew about General Longstreet’s life and times. Dewey is a very serious historian and really knows the full history of “everything” Civil war https://facebook.com/generallongstreetmuseum

We spent some time at the Rose Center of the Arts with Executive Director Beccy Hamm. The arts center is housed in an 1890’s Victorian school house. The center is the cultural arts hub of the Lake way Area. Gallery exhibits, performance spaces, meeting places and a sales gallery. We also met up with representatives from the Morristown Theatre Guild and Theatrical Company where we learned of the many shows slated for the coming months. Go:  https//:www.rosecenter.org

Panther Creek State Park was quite spectacular, Jason Chadwell, Park Manager showed us the incredible sites including an overlook of Lake Cherokee. We also met Craig Price who discussed the newest and most challenging 18-hole Disc golf course. No clubs, just special Frisbee discs thrown into basket-catch hoops.

Hillbilly’s Cabin Restaurant was a fine breakfast spot. We enjoyed Spanish Omelets’ and real coffee! Then we were off to the Meeting Place Country Store & Antiques, and did some shopping for fun oldies but goodies!

Yes, Davey Crockett grew up here and since that time so long ago, so did generations of other families and pioneers in business, industry, medicine, the arts and sports!  For more info go: facebook:Visit Morristown or facebook: retire Hamblen County, TN.

Next week take a peek at The Whitestone Inn on Watts Bar Lake!

 

 

Morristown; Davy Crockett Grew Up Here

Main St. showing 2nd floor walkway!

American Press Travel News–July 4th, Crossville, TN. “Bob & Barb on the Road Again”–As my wife Barb and I continue searching and exploring interesting places to visit we felt that Morristown City, in Hamblen CountyTennessee would be a good one to visit within easy striking distance from our home on the Cumberland Plateau.

After calling Anne G. Ross, Director of Tourism & Program Director, Retire Hamblen County, she made it very easy for us to visit Morristown and see why it would be a fine day-trip for Crossville and surrounding residents. Upon arrival, and after working through Knoxville traffic we arrived in less than 2-hours to Morristown. First we checked in at the Hampton Inn-Morristown (West End) into a delightfully comfortable suite (terrific staff, by the way and quite excellent hot breakfasts too).

A bit about this city that’s quite close to Knoxville: With a population of about 30,000, Morristown’s Main Street area, with an approximate area of a square mile, grew up around a waterway known as Turkey Creek, and the intersection of two railroad lines. In 1962, the creek flooded, nearly wiping out the downtown commercial district. The city developed a plan to modernize Main Street by creating an “overhead sidewalk” that would turn the second floor of the existing buildings into a new “street”, while serving as a canopy for the sidewalks below.

After checking in, we then walked and gawked at various antique and other shops, both at ground level and up the ramps to their elevated second story walkways. Yes, we made some great collectible, but usable finds for our home in Crossville, and during our stay, tasted delightful meals at places such as Jersey Girls with corned beef special sandwiches, The Little Dutch with their delicious salmon entrees’, Hillbilly’s breakfast spot for Spanish Omelets’, and we lunched at Timeless Elegance Tea Room with their famous Chicken & Dumplings, run by a dynamic duo Mr. Kelly and Howard Long (more details on dining experiences in, and all the other great attractions and places we visited in the 2nd edition of our visit, next week).

Restaurants in Morristown were varied and quite excellent!

For its size, Morristown has so many restaurants that for about one year you can dine at a different one every day if you so desire.   After a downtown walking tour with Barbara Garrow, Director of Crossroads Downtown Partnerships’, we really got a good look of what a fine; progressive planned downtown can be in almost any small town America.

Taking a look back in history, we visited a most famous early outdoor pioneer’s home; Davy Crockett. Crockett grew up in and around Morristown; he was born in nearby Greene County.  When visiting pioneer homes you notice how small everything from the height of the doorways to the size of the beds and chairs being so much smaller than today’s cottages and homes. Old time folks were smaller in stature in the “good old days.”

For you sports lovers: In 1985 and 1987, Morristown had teams qualify for the Little League World Series; the 1985 team finished third. The Morristown teams are two of nine Tennessee teams that have advanced to the series in Pennsylvania.

In 2006, Morristown placed fourth in the Little League Softball World Series. In 2007, Morristown won the Little League Softball World Series.

Next issue we’ll present everything we just cannot fit in today including the 700-miles of shoreline of Lake Cherokee and the arts and drama programs! Go: www.tourism@morristownchamber.com for additional information.

A facsimile of Davy Crockett’s flint-lock rifle. I told Barb to take it as a souvenir.
Davy Crockett’s family living room! Also served as a cooking room and workshop too!

Baxter Tennessee Catfish Fee to Fish Pond

American Press Travel News–June 26th, Bob & Barb Stopping to Smell the Roses and the catfish–Cats for a Fee On another planet (or so it seemed as I spent two years in the Congo) I fished nearly every day in creeks, ponds and even the deepest river in the world at 1290-feet deep.  I had catfish take my baits and lures along with all manner of other actual game fish that jumped, put on a great acrobatic show and had teeth, such as the tiger fish made of nightmares in this striped biter and slasher.  But the catfish dove, pulled and bulldozed their way towards the bottom.  On a dock at the Congo, I saw a 600-pounder being cut up for the pot. These wild-ones put up a fine fight, and smaller ones that didn’t break my line or rod, roasted over bamboo coals, were excellent fare.

There are nearly 3,000 known species of catfish in the world, but it is thought that the actual number of catfish species could be as high as 4,500, as many species of catfish are found in areas where there is little or no human contact. I counted about 30-different catfish species that I caught during my time in Africa.

Here in the states there are many varieties, but the ones most of us like to catch and eat are Channel Cats. Twin Lakes Catfish Farm is your spot!  They have Channel Cats, Blue Cats, Flatheads, and farm fed fish as well. They stock 10-15-thousand of them and they are ready to catch and keep, or catch and release for a fee.

It’s the first week of summer, and that’s what fishing is all about; togetherness sharing quality time in the summer outdoors. What we witnessed during our visit were families enjoying time together fishing.  The catfish farm has an RV park, a stage for events, a restaurant, a tackle shop where you can buy or rent gear if you forgot yours and a bait shop too! The Pippin Family, Greta Hurst, Greg Pippin and Lesette Pippin all work and manage what started in 1946 by J. Fred and Evelyn Pippin who purchased the first part of the farm. In 2000 the rest of the family moved onto the property and decided to take the idea of a catfish pay lake and make it a reality. They did!

April through October each Saturday they run a tournament where participants can win a trophy and some cash too! They also host special tourneys for kids and veterans, ladies and special partner’s tournaments.  Greg told me that once in awhile, someone hooks up catfish to 90-pounds in his lakes, and then its pandemonium of fun for the angler, and everyone watching, as well.

Yes, catfish is on the menu at their restaurant, but so is all other non-catfish fare as well!

You pay one fee for all day catch and release, and another fee for catch and keep as well as paying by the pound for your fresh caught catfish. Open Thursday through Sunday, and they’re located at Exit 280 off of I-40, go north 2.5 miles on highway 56 to 580 Gainesboro Hwy. This is fun for you and pals, or for the whole family. Call 931-858-2333 for any additional information.

Great thing about fishing is “God does not deduct mans time on earth when he ( or she) is fishing!”

Whitestone Country Inn “A Sanctuary for More Than Your The Soul”

Bob & Barb Epstein “On The Road Again” and Stopping to Smell The Roses”

American Press travel News–5/19/18-“On the Road Again”—We travel far and wide to experience and bring you to places that are just off the beaten path and this week we have a special treat that’s just down the road from the Glade.

The Whitestone Inn  (just down I-40 towards Knoxville) sits on some 360 acres of prime country land in Tennessee on the shores of Watts Bar Lake (stripers-big guys and dolls, walleye, bass, huge cat’s and a dozen other fighters). Surrounded by a wildlife and waterfowl refuge, the Inn is close to all East Tennessee activities and attractions such as DollyWood , the Great Smoky Mountains and Gatlinburg to mention a few. Yet this Inn is still far enough away for you to find sanctuary and relaxation in the tranquility of God’s creation-nature in all her abundance. This Inn has been voted one of the “Ten Most Romantic Inns in America” by America’s Historic Inns Group. More than a few weddings have been held here at their chapel and gazebo overlook. Huge Belgian horses offer up wagon and hay rides and just looking over the paddocks and landscape can be a major breath of fresh air and excitement for every member of the family.

The Innkeepers are the Chambers family; all 8 of them, and they offer what has become to be known as the “Brigadoon Experience” where one guest (Bobby Scobey) says it all “Whitestone is the only place I’ve ever been homesick for other than home and Barbara and I after spending just one night, reluctantly left after a breakfast we’ll never forget with that same feeling. To say that the Inn has comfortable rooms and terrific décor would be an understatement. We slept in one of their rooms with a view that wouldn’t quit, eagles flying by our windows as we relaxed in our bathroom Jaccuzi bath, giant king size poster bed-we just didn’t want to leave!

Watt’s Bar Lake is a fisherman’s paradise, striped bass are a big draw here and just about every freshwater warm water fish can be taken in these prolific waters. The walking trails through and around the Whitestone property are absolutely terrific. The views just go on and on and on-a landscape of special treasures all around you.

The food at the Inn is also quite excellent. So wonderful that guests kept requesting the recipes so the owners published a book titled “Favorite Recipes of Whitestone Inn.”

We loved the poached eggs on potato cakes and blueberry stuffed French toast. We are now spoiled so we can’t even think of just a bagel and cheese anymore-just kidding!

The hardcover recipe book full of their charming Tennessee recipes and pictures of the Inn, with dinner meals and breakfast meals is available by contacting the Inn at www.whitestoneinn.com or calling 1-888-247-2464. You can of course make reservations to stay or just visit for dinner by contacting these numbers and e-mail address.

An interesting note for you RV’r’s wanting to drive into the Inn you cannot. The entrance is through an authentic barn-right through the middle of it. So you would have to park your unit at another drive area entrance and walk over. Naturally you can drive your tow car through the barn and that’s how we visited.

Get in touch and make a visit to the Whitestone Inn, you cannot be disappointed!