Category Archives: Pets Unlimited

What the Heck is a Sea Horse?

Philippine Seahorse                                    American Press Travel News–11/20/17–“The Seahorse is the name given to 54 species of small marine fishes in the genus Hippocampus. “Hippocampus” comes from the Ancient Greek word hippos (ἵπποςhíppos) meaning “horse” and kampos (κάμποςkámpos) meaning “sea monster”. “The word “seahorse” can also be written as two separate words (sea horse), or hyphenated (sea-horse). Having a head and neck suggestive of a horse, seahorses also feature segmented bony armor, an upright posture and a curled prehensile tail. The above was from Wikipedia, below is from me:  They really are a fish, but their characteristics are weird. A horse-like head, a monkey like prehensile tail, a pouch like a Kangaroo, a bony exo-skeleton like insects, independently moving eyes like a lizard, etc. They are carnivores and like their cousins the Pipe fish, are the only critters where the males exclusively care for their eggs after fertilization and they bear their young. They taste bad and although they move rather slowly and are specialists in camoflage they are not gone after as food from bigger sea animals and fishes. Frankly, I, as so many aquarium enthusiasts are intrigued by these amazing animals.  

Pictures of the Week

Caught in the act of walking on water! Dogs, wonderful dogs!
Dog and owner near look-a-likes!
My Terry in better days! Relaxes on one of our stone picnic tables just up from the pond!
When we called our Terry “Little Bear.” We loved him for near 12-years and now he rests!!!
What is the world without a Black Lab?
Our motor home guard gator! This 8-footer lived under our motor coach when we lived in Polk County at our RV lots at River Ranch. No he never bothered us or Terry, we fed him bill collectors!

American Press Travel News–Monday Nov. 13th, Bob’s images:

Traveling with Dog!

Roanoke, VI. in front of the great Roanoke Hotel. The fountain is for humans and their dogs too!

American Press Travel News-Nov 12th,-PSL, FL.-Bob’s thoughts on traveling with “dog.”

Since Barb and I have been married we raised several dogs, along with our two sons.

Since our boys to men, headed out into the world, we were left with our pup sons and daughters and we travel frequently as outdoor adventurer’s, and travel writers.  We have learned  to travel with our little buddies best for them, and us as well.

Just a few decades ago, traveling with your dog wasn’t quite as easy as it is today. Recently, we traveled to MD. from Florida and stopped in Florence, in S. Carolina, off of I-95. Just about every over-night accommodation, accommodated your dog. Many restaurants were pet friendly, various events allowed your dog to attend as well.

When we first moved to the Florida Keys (many moons over Miami ago) we had to sneak our dog into our accommodations, and there were no restaurants that let your pet into. For us to even find an apartment that was pet friendly back then was almost impossible. In the past twenty years, we acquired a motor home, and our travel issues with our dog Charlie were over! Virtually every campground allowed dogs, and most importantly Charlie-Boy was a happy camper as he had his place and the regularity of a home no matter where we went. His foods, always having water, air conditioning, and not being cramped into a back seat was excellent for his comfort. He was able to walk over for a reassuring head-pet, anytime as we drove America! Everyone’s health was kept in check with the easy regularity of the day to day tripping. When he needed to run, do his cleaning out, or whatever we did together the motor home was perfect. Of course we had the extra security besides our double-barrel, of his healthy lungs and even the couple of times thugs did try to get in over-night, Charlie let them know he had canines waiting to tear into them with.  

A few things to remember: Watch for skunks, your dog, as Charlie did just once, mistook one for a cat to chase. Took two weeks to stop the great odor in our coach. Always use a leash to protect your pet from the unexpected. Feed on a daily schedule, and make sure there is always fresh water for Mr. or Mr’s Rufus. Don’t let your pet stray into the woods, or get too close and friendly with other animals. Ticks, fleas and potential diseases can be transmitted easily. Make sure when you leave home-base, you carry all papers and medicines for your doggies. Just in case you need to visit a Vet. in some far-flung location in your travels. Take the favorite toys, and the bed your child is comfortable in. With regularity and familiarity, your dog will travel best, and will allow you to bring him home as healthy and happy as when you left your home-base, and make you glad too that he was aboard your American tour, as well.