Category Archives: hunting

Alaska is the Last Frontier, a Pioneer’s Valhalla if They Live “Prepared.”

AmericanPressTravelNews-March 16th,-Bob and Barb “On the Road Again” to the Florida Keys! The plan: Head for Alaska during the summer to fish, photograph, meet and greet, get to Inuit Craftsmen to try my hand at carving bone and wood objects being taught by the Masters.

My pals dog! Major point and result was wild bird dinner thanks to my trust 16-gauge.
Pheasant “over glass” not under, for dinner!
Kodiac Island, AK. Seals were all over the place! So were the fish.

2017 Bay Scallop Season in Dixie/Taylor Counties in Florida are Now Set

 

 NEWS RELEASE-Forwarded by AmericanPressTravelNews.com–The 2017 bay scallop season for Dixie County and parts of Taylor County will be open from June 16 through Sept. 10. This includes all state waters from the Suwannee River through the Fenholloway River. These changes are for 2017 only and are an opportunity to explore regionally-specific bay scallop seasons. These changes were discussed at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) meeting on Feb. 8, where staff was directed to work with local community leaders on selecting potential 2017 season dates and to adopt changes by executive order.

At the Feb. 8 meeting, staff also updated the Commission on the status of bay scallops in St. Joseph Bay in Gulf County, and set a July 25 through Sept. 10 recreational bay scallop season off Gulf County, including all waters in St. Joseph Bay and those west of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County, through the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County.

A prolonged red tide event in late 2015 negatively impacted the scallop population in St. Joseph Bay, which led to modified local scallop regulations for 2016 that included a shortened season and reduced bag limits. FWC researchers conducted a scallop restoration project last year within St. Joseph Bay to help speed the recovery of the scallop population. These efforts have been going well and the scallop population has shown signs of improvement. Staff will conduct similar restoration efforts in 2017.

All other portions of the bay scallop harvest zone will be open from July 1 through Sept. 24. This includes all state waters from the Pasco-Hernando county line to the Suwannee River Alligator Pass Daybeacon 4 in Levy County and from north and west of Rock Island near the mouth of the Fenholloway River in Taylor County through the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County.

Bag and vessel limits throughout the entire bay scallop harvest zone will be 2 gallons whole bay scallops in shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person, with a maximum of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in shell or 1/2 gallon bay scallop meat per vessel.

At the December 2017 Commission meeting, staff will review public feedback on these changes and make a recommendation for future management. To submit your feedback on bay scallop regulations, visit MyFWC.com/SaltwaterComments.

For more information on these changes, visit MyFWC.com/Commission and select “Commission Meetings,” then click on the link below “Next Meeting.”

For information on bay scallop regulations, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on “Saltwater Fishing,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Bay Scallops.”

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Heading for the Pow Wow-An Indigenous American Indian Yearly Event in TN.

AmericanPressTravelNews.com-Cookville, TN. Oct. 29th,-Bob and Barb, yes, we are on the road again. This time we are heading for the Cumberland Plateau 15th Annual American Indian Pow Wow in Cookville, TN. 

Left to right_ Spider Woman, Spirit Hawk Bob and Awano, our new friends at the Pow Wow.
Left to right_ Spider Woman, Spirit Hawk Bob and Awano, our new friends at the Pow Wow.

We love American Indian programs and culture. It’s the “real” America in so many ways. Hand made knives, buckskin clothes, earth colors.

Lots of foods from Indigenous American Indian booths, all kinds of crafts, dances and music with plenty of drum-beats. Well, we weren’t disappointed. The host drum was by Southern Echo and the Emcee was Bert (Iron Turtle) Cox. There was flute playing, a childrens candy rush to the beat of the drums, intertribal dances, Sisters American Indians food, story telling, and lots of teaching and showing the cultures in their art and crafts. Veterans and all service members in both home and military, firefighters (I am a retired 18-years Firefighter, so I was included in the circle of honor dancing) Law Enforcement, EMT’s,  and teachers. A local non-profit Indigenous Intertribal Corp. hosted the Pow Wow. Barb and I had a very fine time and were honored to be amongst America’s first peoples in history. 

 drumming up the spirits both old and new!

drumming up the spirits both old and new!
Dances were a great part of the Pow Wow. They signified the relationship to earth, sky and all things in nature.
Dances were a great part of the Pow Wow. They signified the relationship to earth, sky and all things in nature.
Natural selection!
Natural selection!
Veterans of Vietnam War pray and remember their brothers! Lots of introspection was on display and in the spirit air.
Veterans of Vietnam War pray and remember their brothers! Lots of introspection was on display and in the spirit air.

 

Colorful and vibrancy was on full display!
Colorful and vibrancy was on full display!

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Alaska’s Greatest Outdoor Legends “Colorful Characters Who Built The Fishing and Hunting Industries”

P1070359AmericanPressTravelNews-August 12th,-Goose Holler’Farm, TN.-When my friend Doug Kelly sent me his new book; Alaska’s Greatest Outdoor Legends, I had already known that he had spent some time in my favorite fishing and wildlife state, but did not know he was working on this neat, informative book. After reading most of it, I realized he had a lot of help from all manner of agencies and guides who wanted to assist Kelly in putting together the facts and the real story of so many of the rightfully called legends of Alaska’s great outdoors! You won’t find this information on any of the fine outdoor channels, however, I am able to tell you that the book is worth the price and the “read.” Digging into the lives of real outdoorsmen and women of Alaska from the 1870’s to modern times would take a ton of research and Kelly did this for you/us! Go for it! It was published by the University of Alaska Press in Fairbanks.P1070360