Category Archives: hunting

“Africa on a Pin & a Prayer” Excerpt From the Book

Views down the highway!!! This was an inland super highway. Didn’t need a machete for.

American Press Travel News–Excerpt from Bob’s Book: Africa on a Pin & a Prayer”–Camping and Traveling Through  Uganda, Africa, Part 1

During our travels to this Northern area of Uganda, we came close to the border with Sudan and arrived at a prison. The prison warden allowed travelers in to a special store area, where handmade items crafted by the inmates could be purchased. These hand crafted items were made by prisoners, who were incarcerated for every crime known to man; including political crimes against the immediate, yet temporary rulers of the government (Idi Amin took over and had everyone killed that did not agree with him a bit later on after we were long gone). These inmates, just like the license plate makers in American prisons, earn their keep by making tribal animal skin covered drums, spears, medicine masks, African musical instruments and woodcarvings.
During our travels through, over and along the dusty, rutted roads of this area, we stopped frequently to look at exotic trees and bushes such as the giant and curious cucumber tree, with large inedible cucumber like fruits hanging down to the ground, alongside the road.
We saw several varieties of flowering cacti; they showed us a rainbow of colors that seemed to have been painted by Picasso.
Driving along, we would suddenly come across giraffes that towered above some of the acacia trees, which they fed on. Herds of zebra would suddenly race across the road in front of us, and we would come to an abrupt stop and marvel at the sight of thundering hoofs kicking up dust all around us.
Occasionally, impala would prance along side the road, being chased by predators or perhaps just frightened by our vehicle.
We had passed safely over a bridge one day and returning the next day, we found that same bridge washed out. Auto’s not equipped as we were with our four-wheel land rover, were stranded and backed up near the bridge, unable to fiord the swift waters that was caused by sudden overnight heavy thunderstorms.
After assessing the situation, I climbed up and along a walkway railing that did not wash away with the bridge, and affixed a cable from our winch to a sturdy tree trunk across the swollen brook. I went back, started the winch and dragged our land rover, across the stream. To the accompaniment of envious stares, by those that were not similarly equipped, (they were driving MGA’s and road sedans) and were forced to remain trapped on the other side.
Continuing on back towards the Uganda capitol of Kampala, we came across a family cooking a stew over a bright red-hot coal fire. We approached and saw that they had lizards and other animals they had captured and gathered for their subsistence meal, that was their fare probably since time began.
We were invited to join in out of courtesy and hospitality, but Gene and I had a difficult time doing so because we were just not ready to take on foods that hadn’t been cleaned and processed, or at least had their bowels and intestines removed. This was not the case later on in our trip when we ate things that today I wouldn’t even think of touching-acute hunger can make you do things otherwise.
One thing we learned the hard way in Africa was, that refusing the hospitality of a shared repast, was an insult to those that invited you to “break bread” or lizard with them. Informality was belching and displaying other natural body noises such as flatulence, which was expected and was a clear sign to your hosts that all was well and acceptable and it proved satiation to all around you.
So when we understood this, we belched out loud often, after each and every meal. That is, the meals we obtained and could get to stay down, the victuals we did not have to sneak under the table to the dogs in waiting. Part 2 March 22.

Our Land Rover loaded with trade goods!! That’s Dr. Gene!!

Heading to Leopold From Kisali, The Congo

 

As we traveled we traded and collected items that were not trade goods for the traveler!! The items were used by the locals themselves.
American Press Travel News–March 19th, Leopoldville The Congo section of my book: “Africa on a Pin & a Prayer.”
We left Kisali on the “boat” a riverboat pushing a huge barge a microcosm of African life being pushed along by a 2000 horsepower diesel engine turning a paddlewheel that splashed at the river and inexorably pushed more than 1000 souls along a river that hasn’t changed since, or before written history one iota. Congolese minister’s concubines took up most of the riverboat rooms and Gene and I got lucky enough with the help of a Belgian business man, to grab one of those rooms and we camped out there. God had mercy, we did not have to sleep on the deck with the water bugs and other slimy critters that came out on deck under cover of darkness. We settled in for a 20-day run to Leopoldville. I spent a lot of time on the barge. I visited the Cayman croc sellers, the fruit and vegetable vendors and looked over the booty and bounty of what many villagers had bagged in the jungle’s hinterlands smoked monkeys, boa constrictor snakes for food or sale to collectors, butterflies kept in between palm leaves, also for the collector. Raw latex from Goodman’s Goodyear rubber plantation on its way to be processed into gloves, tires, rubber boots, condoms. Wildly colorful songbirds and parrots, snakes, monkeys, sloths, bamboo and logs destined for trading in the capitol of the Congo, Leopoldville.
Every minute was an adventure on the riverboat. Villagers whose huts hugged the river banks along the way, braved the boats wake and came out to the barge in pirogues hollowed out wood log dugout canoes, to trade fresh produce, including cut pieces of sugar cane a favorite treat for everyone aboard.
All the things done in the village were being accomplished on the barge as it was pushed at about 5 mph towards Leopoldville was being done there. Clothes washing, cooking child care and even love making on the decks sometimes behind a cloth shade.
Drinking fresh. clean water out of a cut vine!!!

 

Work Sharp Outdoor Sharpeners

 

American Press Travel News–Feb.26th, Port St Lucie, FL. Bob and Barb “On The Road Again”–New Product of the week: The Ken Onion Edition Knife & Tool Sharpener; a Work Sharp Outdoor Product of distinction. Nothing is more frustrating or dangerous than a dull blade when doing any cutting job. A blade needs to be sharp and cut exactly where the cutting is needed in a precise way. A dull blade does cut, but it may, and often cuts and slips to the hand or the body part of the user. This newly designed product (saw it recently at Bass Pro Shops) has now been in my hands for a week and nothing in the kitchen or sporting equipment room is dull anymore. After the kitchen knives now keenly sharp and ready for any job, my hunting knife, pocket knife,scissors hand ax and even my mower blade is ready to cleanly cut for its intended usages.

A bit about the tool. The unit is sturdy, and features 5-different grits of flexible Abrasive Belts, has a sharpening guide that runs bevels from 15-30-degrees. It sharpens knives and tools and the WSKTS-KO performs as described and recommended. What I was looking for was a tool that creates precise, repeatable bevels on any knife with the adjustable sharpening guide. It had to sharpen to any angle between 15-30-degrees to get the right edge for the job I was trying to do. Just removing the guide and swiveling the cassette head to grind your lawn and outdoor tools is a snap!!  I found mine at Bass Pro Shops, but they are available in most sports stores everywhere. Give a call or check them out at: Workshoptools.com 1-800-597-6170   

 

White River Knives–Picked Best of the Best

Provided News Release to American Press Travel News

White River Knife & Tool, Fremont, MI, January 7, 2019–White River Knife and Tool chosen as Field & Stream’s Best of the Best for 2018.

“It is an honor being chosen top knife for Field & Stream’s prestigious Best of the Best for hunting and fishing gear of 2018. Our family of knife makers could not be more pleased.”–John Cammenga, President.

This year White River’s $150 MSRP Small Game knife was chosen. With a choice of Micarta handles, a 2.62 inch blade of razor sharp CPMS35VN steel, overall length of 7.25 inches and at a feathery 2.75 ounces this is one ultra-handy game knife.

White River’s Small Game knife has proven effective for everything from squirrels to elk and fish to fowl. This is the second time in the last four years that White River Knives has won this award.

Field & Stream’s Field Editor and tester David Petzal says –“In the end what you have here is an enlarged scalpel that’s useful all out of proportion to its size.”

— AND —

Be sure to watch How It’s Made on the Science Channel this Thursday, January 10th at 10:00 PM EST on how a White River knife is made.

If you are attending the SHOT Show please come by and visit with the Cammenga family of knife makers — booth 1114 (lower level).

White River Knife and Tool, Inc.
515Industrial Drive
Fremont, MI 49412
www.whiteriverknives.com

Media Professionals Only
For more information please contact
Shults Media Relations, LLC
greatstuff@acsol.net