Category Archives: Outdoor Florida Magazine Travel

Morristown; Davy Crockett Grew Up Here

Main St. showing 2nd floor walkway!

American Press Travel News–July 4th, Crossville, TN. “Bob & Barb on the Road Again”–As my wife Barb and I continue searching and exploring interesting places to visit we felt that Morristown City, in Hamblen CountyTennessee would be a good one to visit within easy striking distance from our home on the Cumberland Plateau.

After calling Anne G. Ross, Director of Tourism & Program Director, Retire Hamblen County, she made it very easy for us to visit Morristown and see why it would be a fine day-trip for Crossville and surrounding residents. Upon arrival, and after working through Knoxville traffic we arrived in less than 2-hours to Morristown. First we checked in at the Hampton Inn-Morristown (West End) into a delightfully comfortable suite (terrific staff, by the way and quite excellent hot breakfasts too).

A bit about this city that’s quite close to Knoxville: With a population of about 30,000, Morristown’s Main Street area, with an approximate area of a square mile, grew up around a waterway known as Turkey Creek, and the intersection of two railroad lines. In 1962, the creek flooded, nearly wiping out the downtown commercial district. The city developed a plan to modernize Main Street by creating an “overhead sidewalk” that would turn the second floor of the existing buildings into a new “street”, while serving as a canopy for the sidewalks below.

After checking in, we then walked and gawked at various antique and other shops, both at ground level and up the ramps to their elevated second story walkways. Yes, we made some great collectible, but usable finds for our home in Crossville, and during our stay, tasted delightful meals at places such as Jersey Girls with corned beef special sandwiches, The Little Dutch with their delicious salmon entrees’, Hillbilly’s breakfast spot for Spanish Omelets’, and we lunched at Timeless Elegance Tea Room with their famous Chicken & Dumplings, run by a dynamic duo Mr. Kelly and Howard Long (more details on dining experiences in, and all the other great attractions and places we visited in the 2nd edition of our visit, next week).

Restaurants in Morristown were varied and quite excellent!

For its size, Morristown has so many restaurants that for about one year you can dine at a different one every day if you so desire.   After a downtown walking tour with Barbara Garrow, Director of Crossroads Downtown Partnerships’, we really got a good look of what a fine; progressive planned downtown can be in almost any small town America.

Taking a look back in history, we visited a most famous early outdoor pioneer’s home; Davy Crockett. Crockett grew up in and around Morristown; he was born in nearby Greene County.  When visiting pioneer homes you notice how small everything from the height of the doorways to the size of the beds and chairs being so much smaller than today’s cottages and homes. Old time folks were smaller in stature in the “good old days.”

For you sports lovers: In 1985 and 1987, Morristown had teams qualify for the Little League World Series; the 1985 team finished third. The Morristown teams are two of nine Tennessee teams that have advanced to the series in Pennsylvania.

In 2006, Morristown placed fourth in the Little League Softball World Series. In 2007, Morristown won the Little League Softball World Series.

Next issue we’ll present everything we just cannot fit in today including the 700-miles of shoreline of Lake Cherokee and the arts and drama programs! Go: www.tourism@morristownchamber.com for additional information.

A facsimile of Davy Crockett’s flint-lock rifle. I told Barb to take it as a souvenir.
Davy Crockett’s family living room! Also served as a cooking room and workshop too!

If You Want the “Outdoor Edge.”

American Press Travel News-New Products June 27th–Crossville, TN.- So we all want an edge when we head outdoors. Especially when fishing, hunting and hiking in “Mothers” back yard. These two items from the the Outdoor Edge Knives and Tools really caught my eye as potentially useful in and emergency and also for laying out our filets for lunch or dinner.  The Filet Flex Pak holds 3-different double tempered bladed filet knives for any size fish to filet, The two stage carbide/ceramic knife sharpener maintains a razor edge for you. I tried it on a knife that needed sharpening and WOW! The blades came sharp so have not used it on these three beauties yet. The hard-side case is perfect for these knives and sharpener. The blades are 6-inch through 9.5 inches. Love this set and can’t wait to be a cutup again once I pop a walleye at the lake or snook at the coast.

 

The ParaCLAW CQD Watch is a zinc alloy, Seiko quartz movement is water resistant to 100-feet. The glass face is mineral glass. The watch is Titanium PVD coated. It has a Lume in dexed display and a Paracord band. You can call this a tactical carry, close quarters defense watch set. When the band is removed, you have a razor sharp hawkbill 1.5 inch claw that can be deployed almost instantly. Hope I never use it for defense, but as a watch its always there just in case. I’ve already used it to open boxes and slice out a few magazine articles from my published magazine pieces for the scrap book. Check them out for these and other cool items for the outdoors person at: www.outdooredge.com  800-447-3343

NOTE: That paracord watchband can be a lifesaver too! Unraveled it is a very tough cord for any emergency use!

 

 

Tiny Houses All The Rage

American Press Travel News-June 16th, 2018–Working on a feature article for The New Pioneer Magazine. lots of interesting folks and today there are even Tiny House schools to teach owners how to build their own customized unit.  Stay tuned!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Country Auctions Are Memorable Events 

Muddy Pond, TN.—May 15th,-What is it that drives so many of us towards wanting to spend a day, or night looking at, and bidding on someone else’s old stuff? Bargains I guess, but I believe it’s a lot more than that. From dishes to tractors, rusting tools, old water pumps, to an automobile, lamp or roll top desk, or even a house and land, auctions are a great way for many folks to quickly dispose of their earthly goods, and get some cash.

An auction is a special happening. Watching other people bid on items, is interesting, entertaining and fun, you can also learn values of your own items at home, too! Getting something at a perceived “good” price just plain feels good.  

We know of the big guys like Christie’s and Sotheby’s that sell items sometimes in the millions of dollars, the top end of the auction sales dollars scale. However, for every one of their auctions, there are thousands of auctions all around the country selling beds, old clothes, books, gold jewelry, silver, copper and brass sundries, furniture–you name it, they sell it!  Hands go up, a tip of the hat, a flip of the finger, and buyers number cards are flashed for a bid, many bidders wait for the very last minute to when the auctioneer counts down “going once, going twice, going three times” slams the hammer down and says “sold.” In our area there’s Pages Auction on RT. 127, and there’s an auction just across the street from the Chronicle at Little Angels each Friday night. But in just about every burg in Tennessee, there will be an auction to go to, as well.

There’s usually a food vendor selling chili dogs, burgers and soda pop, and sometimes, as I found at a recent fund raising auction for the Muddy Pond volunteer fire department, The Mennonite community ladies had pie selections that even now are making my mouth water just thinking about them. I passed on the burgers and dogs, and settled on the pies.  I can still savor the shoofly, blueberry and coconut cream pieces I sampled for lunch that day, on my palate, and in my mind.

Hundreds of folks showed up for this yearly “happening” that featured horse tack, new hand made playhouses and sheds, electric tool and knife sharpeners (I bought one too) wagon wheels, wagons, furniture, lamps, vehicles, farm animals and equipment-even a mule, some ducks, chicks and rabbits. I was happy to buy some tomato and pepper plants-I passed on the mule! Everybody loves the moveable feast of an auction.

Auctions that have variety in their diversity and a colorful auctioneer, draw big crowds. The Muddy Pond, a farming community that prides itself in fine home and shop crafted items; the whole feeling was old country communal and charming. The event made for a very enjoyable occasion. I know people that have completely outfitted their home or apartment from auctions at 10-percent what would have cost them list price new.